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Not just Bronze Briefings 2015

Booker High Wycombe - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 18:05
Here is the timetable for the 2015 series of Briefings, all at 10hrs on Saturdays, which will cover topics covered in the Bronze paper as well as other fascinating subjects. All welcome - aspiring pre-Bronze pilots, trainee instructors mugging up on briefings, anyone feeling a bit rusty - come along and join in.

Categories: Gliding

National Geographic Announces Winners of 2014 Photo Contest

National GeographicNewsFeed - Wed, 12/17/2014 - 21:52

WASHINGTON (Dec. 17, 2014)—Selected from more than 9,000 entries, a photo of a woman spotlighted by the glow of her phone on a crowded train was chosen as the grand-prize winner of the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. The photo, titled “A Node Glows in the Dark,” was shot by Brian Yen of Hong Kong. He has won $10,000 (USD) and a trip to National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., to participate in the annual National Geographic Photography Seminar in January 2015.

“I feel a certain contradiction when I look at the picture,” said Yen. “On the one hand, I feel the liberating gift of technology. On the other hand, I feel people don’t even try to be neighborly anymore, because they don’t have to.”

Nicole Cambre of Brussels, Belgium, placed first in the Nature category for an image of migrating wildebeests in Tanzania, and Triston Yeo of Singapore won in the Places category for a photo of the Budapest thermal spas. Yen’s photo won in the People category, and all three images will be published in National Geographic magazine.

The annual photo contest attracted entries from more than 150 countries. Contestants submitted photographs in three categories: People, Places and Nature. Judging consisted of multiple rounds of evaluation based on creativity, photography quality and genuineness/authenticity of the content. All of the winning photos, along with the honorable mentions, may be viewed at www.ngphotocontest.com.

About the National Geographic Society

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches over 600 million people each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com, and find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, YouTube and Pinterest.

Categories: National Geographic

National Geographic Home Entertainment Serves Up ‘EAT: The Story of Food’ on 2-Disc DVD Set

National GeographicNewsFeed - Tue, 12/16/2014 - 16:56

WASHINGTON (Dec. 16, 2014)—No matter our nationality, food is the one common language we all share, yet it’s one of the most overlooked influences on human history. The six-part National Geographic Channel miniseries “EAT: The Story of Food,” which aired Nov. 21-23, tells how food led us to plant and settle and build civilizations; how it spurred exploration; and how it caused us to alter the planet in remarkable ways. National Geographic Home Entertainment is releasing a special two-disc DVD set of the miniseries today, Dec. 16, on sale for $34.95 to foodies everywhere through http://www.natgeostore.com. The DVD set will be available in wider release at retail on Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015.

The miniseries features original interviews with nearly 70 chefs, food experts and food scientists, including José Andrés, Rachael Ray, Masahuru Morimoto, Marcus Samuelsson, Padma Lakshmi, Eric Ripert and National Geographic Fellow and author Barton Seaver. Their unique opinions and personal stories appear throughout the six themed episodes.

Food Revolutionaries: Christopher Columbus didn’t cross the oceans just for adventure — he did it in search of spice. More than 400 years later, Julia Child brought the flair of French cuisine to American cooks, chef Hector Boiardi’s mass-produced spaghetti sauce made weeknight dinners a breeze, and dozens of other personalities have revolutionized our palates and our tastes in both pivotal and surprisingly overlooked ways.

Carnivores: The story of meat is the story of mankind. When humans first started heating their food to unlock its potential energy, populations increased and people began to live longer. Salting and preservation helped us take our food on the road and allowed us to explore new areas. Today, the food supply can barely keep up with the demand for meat.

Sugar Rushes: Sugar cane was first farmed some 10,000 years ago in India, and, since then, our appetites for the sweeter things in life have not diminished. Chocolate from the New World, coffee from the Middle East and tea from the Far East were all sweetened by Europeans, and the demand for sugar sparked a global slave trade of unprecedented scale. With new ways to produce cheap refined sugar, we also face new challenges of how to control our consumption of it.

Sea Changes: Seafood saved our species from its first threat of extinction, drove the Viking hordes and funded the American Revolution, but unsustainable fishing practices threaten the future of our seafood supply. In order to meet demand, scientists are developing new methods of farming oysters, mussels and sea kelp to feed humanity and heal the oceans.

Guilty Pleasures: Sixty years ago, a novel processed meat called Spam helped fuel the soldiers who defeated Hitler, and now processed foods are a fast and convenient part of everyday life. When the interstate highway system literally paved the way for fast food restaurants, Americans became hooked on fast food. Today, people grapple with how to balance their increasingly hectic schedules with eating food that isn’t loaded with sugar, fat and salt.

Staffs of Life: Grains, more than any other foods, are emblematic of the struggle between the haves and have-nots, as evidenced by the French Revolution, and ancient versus modern, exemplified through the development of packaged sliced bread. In the past 80 years, attempts to refine this once-perfect food have resulted in some bread lacking in nutrition and gluten becoming the newest enemy among food warriors. Today, grains in their purest form have risen again as bakers, craft brewers and gourmet pizza makers embrace the natural and artisanal.

The DVD set also contains special bonus content, including additional interviews with food experts and celebrity chefs such as Graham Elliot, Eric Ripert, Nigella Lawson and José Andrés, as well as tips from National Geographic Books’ “Foods for Health.”

In addition to the DVD release of “EAT: The Story of Food,” the National Geographic Channel and National Geographic Society are exploring the future of food and celebrating our connection to food through a major, multiyear, cross-platform initiative. The initiative grows out of an eight-month series this year in National Geographic magazine, looking at how we can feed our growing world population. The magazine’s coverage is now available as a free iPad app at natgeofoodapp.com. The initiative has also spawned two new books, a website at natgeofood.com, education curriculum, events and exhibitions.

About the National Geographic Society

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches over 600 million people each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com, and find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, YouTube and Pinterest.

 

“EAT: The Story of Food” 2-Disc Set

Available through http://www.natgeostore.com: 12/16/2014

Available at Retail: 1/13/2015

TRT: 270 Mins.

SRP: $34.95

Format: DVD

 

NOTE: Contact Eric Tunell at etunell@ngs.org or (202) 862-8278 for images or review copies.

Categories: National Geographic

New NG Book- JOURNEYS HOME: Inspiring Stories, Plus Tips & Strategies to Find Your Family History

National GeographicNewsFeed - Mon, 12/15/2014 - 21:33

“Something shifts inside of us when we see where we come from, when we unravel the eternal fabric of our extended families; we grow in resilience and understanding.”

-Journalist Jennifer Wilson on her ancestral journey to
Croatia — from “JOURNEYS HOME”

 

WASHINGTON (Dec. 15, 2014)—With the recent surge in geneaological travel, National Geographic gives readers a passport to embark on a search for their family’s ancestry with JOURNEYS HOME: Inspiring Stories, Plus Tips & Strategies to Find Your Family History (National Geographic Books; ISBN 978-1-4262-1381-6; on sale Feb. 3, 2015; hardcover $26).

The book opens with a personal journey to Ireland as recounted by featured author, actor, television director and award-winning travel writer Andrew McCarthy. Following McCarthy’s story are 25 intriguing personal narratives from other contributors, including writers Joyce Maynard, Pico Iyer and Diane Johnson, and National Geographic’s geographer, Juan José Valdés, all in search of their ancestry.

JOURNEYS HOME reveals the powerful sense of identity and security that comes from connecting with one’s heritage. McCarthy was inspired to uncover his Irish roots in part by becoming a father as well as by the importance his Irish wife placed on family legacy. Other journeys in the book span the globe to destinations such as Sicily, Russia, India, Peru, Cuba, Angola and the U.S. states of Virginia, Illinois and California.

Whether the contributors are looking to meet unknown relatives for the first time, unravel family mysteries, walk in the treacherous footsteps of ancestors or return as an adult to a place they fled as a child, each pilgrimage is linked by the common desire to know one’s past in order to reconnect and gain a sense of belonging. Each compelling and poignant tale is punctuated by stunning imagery that captures the beauty of the locale and by sidebars chock-full of tips on how to experience each culture in more depth.

The book includes a foreword by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Spencer Wells, who directs National Geographic’s Genographic Project, which uses advanced DNA analysis to trace human origins and better understand our collective past. DNA testing has gained momentum in recent years as an impetus for genealogical travel.

JOURNEYS HOME concludes with “Genealogy 101,” a 10-step guide for readers interested in planning their own journeys home as well as research tips and information about the featured destinations.

 

Destinations/contributors:

Ireland- Andrew McCarthy

Angola and Virginia, United States – Joe Mozingo

Argentina – Alex Bellos

Cambodia – Nawuth Keat with Martha E. Kendall

British Columbia, Canada – Joyce Maynard

Ontario, Canada – Tiffany Thornton

Croatia – Jennifer Wilson

Cuba – Juan José Valdés

Czech Republic – Joseph Hurka

England – Jim Eagles

Germany – Joe Yogerst

India – Pico Iyer

Japan - Edward Iwata

Laos and Vietnam – Thomas Fuller

Mexico – Peter McBride

Norway – Dave Hage

Peru - Marie Arana

The Philippines and California, United States - Barbara A. Noe

Krakow, Poland – Nina Strochlic

Russia – Hilary Mandleberg

Scotland – Andrew Evans

Sicily, Italy – Renée Restivo

Taiwan, Republic of China – Mei-Ling Hopgood

Tanzania – Donovan Webster

Ulster, Ireland, and Northern Ireland – Liz Beatty

Illinois, United States – Diane Johnson

 

About Featured Author Andrew McCarthy

Andrew McCarthy, who wrote the featured chapter on Ireland for JOURNEYS HOME, is an actor and television director, known for his roles in the 1980s films “St. Elmo’s Fire,” “Mannequin,” “Weekend at Bernie’s,” “Pretty in Pink” and “Less Than Zero.” He also has an illustrious writing career. He is an editor-at-large at National Geographic Traveler magazine and has written for The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, Slate, Travel+Leisure, Afar, Men’s Journal, Bon Appetit, National Geographic Adventure and others. The Society of American Travel Writers named McCarthy 2010’s “Travel Journalist of the Year,” and he was cited three times for notable work in the “Best American Travel Writing” series. His 2012 memoir, “The Longest Way Home,” became a New York Times best-seller.

About National Geographic Books

National Geographic Books creates and distributes print and digital works that inspire, entertain, teach and give readers access to a world of discovery — and possibility. Each year we publish more than 150 new books for adults, families and children on a wide range of nonfiction subjects, from animals to travel, cartography to history, fun facts to moving stories. National Geographic books are available in 38 languages and more than 60 countries and in countless bookstores, mass-market outlets, schools, libraries and specialty retailers throughout the world. For more information, visit facebook.com/NatGeoBooks and nationalgeographic.com/books.

Categories: National Geographic

National Geographic Magazine, January 2015

National GeographicNewsFeed - Mon, 12/15/2014 - 17:02

Full-size PDF version of press release available here.

Categories: National Geographic

New Exhibition to Showcase National Geographic Photo Camp Student Photography

National GeographicNewsFeed - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 17:05

WASHINGTON (Dec. 11, 2014)—Since 2003, National Geographic Photo Camp has partnered with organizations worldwide to inspire young people to explore their communities through a camera lens. “Photo Camp: A Decade of Storytelling,” a new National Geographic Museum exhibition opening Thursday, Dec. 18, will feature spectacular images captured by students who have participated in the 67 workshops held to date. Since its inception, the program has reached a global audience of more than 50 million through media coverage and exhibitions of student work. The free exhibition, which will be on display at the museum’s M Street gallery, will include photos from the most recent workshop, Photo Camp South Sudan.

“Photo Camp is all about teaching young people about the power of photography and giving them the tools to tell their own stories in communities around the world,” said Kathryn Keane, vice president of National Geographic Exhibitions. “This exhibition celebrates this wonderful decade-long program that is core to National Geographic’s mission to inspire, illuminate and teach.”

Photo Camp is conducted in partnership with VisionWorkshops. Olympus Imaging America donates the cameras used by the participants. Each workshop connects National Geographic photographers with groups of students ranging in age from 13 to 25. Photo Camp South Sudan, held this past September in partnership with Internews and with funding support from the U.S. Agency for International Development, was led by National Geographic magazine contributing photographers Ed Kashi, Amy Toensing and Matt Moyer along with Ross Goldberg, National Geographic’s vice president of strategic development. The six-day workshop taught the students how to use photography to document the ways in which the South Sudanese are engaging in cross-tribal peace-building activities. Toensing, Moyer and three of the Photo Camp South Sudan student participants will appear at National Geographic headquarters on Tuesday, Jan. 13, at noon for a panel discussion as part of National Geographic Live’s “Tuesdays at Noon” programming.

In “Photo Camp: A Decade of Storytelling,” the nearly 150 student photographs are organized around six themes: love, survival, work, home, community and self-image. Behind-the-scenes photos offer insight into the program dynamics and illustrate the huge impact these workshops have had on the over 2,500 young people, including at-risk and refugee teens, who have participated. The exhibit centerpiece contains one photo from each of the 67 workshop locations, accompanied by a video overview of Photo Camp South Sudan that was shot and produced by Toensing and Moyer.

Generous support for this exhibition was provided by Iara Lee, founder of Cultures of Resistance Network and a member of the National Geographic International Council of Advisors.

Also open in the Museum’s 17th Street galleries are “Spinosaurus: Lost Giant of the Cretaceous,” which will run until April 12, 2015, and “FOOD: Our Global Kitchen,” which will be open through Feb. 22, 2015.

The National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C., is open every day (except Dec. 25) from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $11 for adults; $9 for National Geographic members, military, students, seniors and groups of 25 or more; $7 for children 5-12; and free for local school, student and youth groups (18 and under; advance reservation required). Tickets may be purchased online at www.ngmuseum.org; via telephone at (202) 857-7700; or in person at the National Geographic Museum, 1145 17thStreet, N.W., between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. For more information on group sales, call (202) 857-7281.

About the National Geographic Society

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches over 600 million people each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com and find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, YouTube and Pinterest.

 

Categories: National Geographic

National Geographic Studios to Release Original Film ‘Living in the Age of Airplanes’ to Giant Screen, Digital, IMAX® and Museum Cinemas Worldwide

National GeographicNewsFeed - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 16:56

WASHINGTON (Dec. 11, 2014)—National Geographic Studios has acquired the global theatrical rights to the film “Living in the Age of Airplanes,” which takes audiences on an epic journey through 18 countries and across all seven continents as it presents a unique perspective on how the airplane has changed the world. It will be available to 15/70 flat and dome film screens and to all digital screens when it is released worldwide on April 10, 2015.

Produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (“One Six Right”), “Living in the Age of Airplanes” is narrated by actor and pilot Harrison Ford and features an original score by Academy Award®-winning composer and pilot James Horner (“Avatar,” “Titanic”). The film was shot in 95 locations around the globe, from remote places like the South Pole and the Maldives to historically significant sites of ancient civilizations. The narrative weaves together the profound ways that aviation has transformed our lives, connecting countries and cultures while expanding horizons and minds.

“Since we were all born into a world with airplanes, it’s hard to imagine that jet travel itself is only 60 years old, just a tick on the timeline of human history,” said Terwilliger. “Yet practically overnight, our perception of crossing continents and oceans at 500 mph has turned from fascination to frustration. I want to reignite people’s wonder for one of the most extraordinary aspects of the modern world.”

“‘Living in the Age of Airplanes’ is the perfect film for National Geographic,” said Mark Katz, president of distribution for National Geographic Studios. “Its visuals are breathtaking, it tells an amazing story and will engage audiences on a variety of levels, from adventure to geography to exploration and more, which aligns completely with National Geographic’s mission to inspire, illuminate and teach.”

For more information, visit www.airplanesmovie.com.

Note: Images can be found on the ftp site:

http://press.nationalgeographic.com/downloads/film_airplane_movie/

user name:  press    password:  press 

About the National Geographic Society

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches over 600 million people each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. National Geographic Studios is the video/film production arm of the Society, which creates research-based television, film and digital entertainment content. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com and find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, YouTube and Pinterest.

About Terwilliger Productions

Terwilliger Productions is an independent production company based in Los Angeles that produces high-quality, thought-provoking films. The company is best known for the aviation documentary “One Six Right,” a film that celebrates local airports as unsung heroes, which was distributed worldwide. For more information, visit www.terwilligerproductions.com.

Categories: National Geographic

December newsletter..........

Booker High Wycombe - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 09:52
.......read it here.   
Categories: Gliding

Sunny Saturday

Booker High Wycombe - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 00:13
A day of clear sky, sunshine and light winds - ideal for the aerobatics enthusiasts and other club members to get airborne.  Many folks were about with the the FI(S) and BI course taking place in the morning, with the opportunity to get flying in the afternoon.

Categories: Gliding

Booker pilots score again

Booker High Wycombe - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 23:23
This week the (powered) World Intermediate Aerobatic Championships 2014 have been taking place in Mossel Bay, South Africa, with teams from 13 countries competing. The 7-strong British team included 3 current and former Booker members: Paul Brice, Emily Collett and Mike Collett. The pilots have had a pretty tough week with less than ideal weather, in particular some strong winds, but the British team did brilliantly, coming away with Silver - the South Africans won Gold, and the Czech Republic Bronze. The full results can be found here. And below are some pics shamelessly pinched from the British Team's Facebook page.

Congratulations to all!!



Categories: Gliding

‘Living Walls’ Prove Effective at Saving African Lions

National GeographicNewsFeed - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 06:01

TANZANIA (Dec. 2, 2014)A 10-year study in Tanzania offers strong scientific evidence for the effectiveness of “Living Walls” as predator deterrents, saving lions by reducing the need for human retaliation against the big cats. Homesteads using these environmentally friendly, predator-proof enclosures report a virtually 100 percent reduction in lion attacks on livestock. The research was published today in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation.

The study, conducted by Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld, Charles Trout and Elvis Kisimir, all of the African People & Wildlife Fund, reported areas that installed Living Walls — enclosures that combine fast-growing thorny trees as fence posts with chain link fencing — from 2008 onwards demonstrated a 99.9 percent success rate in preventing attacks on livestock, resulting in a halt to retaliatory lion killings. The number of lions killed dropped to zero immediately.

Top predators, including lions, are quickly disappearing in the wild, victims of conflict with humans, prey depletion, and habitat loss or degradation. A 2012 study published in Biodiversity and Conservation reported lion populations in Africa had dropped as low as 32,000, down nearly 90 percent in the last century.

“We set out to show that by working with local, indigenous populations and modern resources, we could save lions, and that’s exactly what we did,” said Lichtenfeld, who co-directs the African People & Wildlife Fund with partner Trout. Co-author Kisimir, a Maasai from the town of Narakauwo, heads the organization’s human-wildlife conflict prevention program. Lichtenfeld’s work is also supported by the National Geographic Society’s Big Cats Initiative (BCI).

“Living Wall” is a term coined by Lichtenfeld and her colleagues at the African People & Wildlife Fund. Traditional homesteads in this region, called “bomas,” are built with a main outer ring of fencing that encloses the family’s houses and with a smaller, inner ring for keeping livestock. The Living Walls are constructed around the inner ring. They are assembled using living trees native to the area, called Commiphora africana, as fence posts, which is a Maasai innovation, and chain link fencing. As the thorny trees grow, the enclosures become an environmentally friendly, long-lasting physical and visual barrier to predators. During the study period, the researchers compared large-carnivore attack rates at 84 unprotected bomas with 62 bomas that were fortified with Living Walls.

At an average cost of $500 per Living Wall, with the owner contributing just 25 percent of the cost, the protection of livestock and the resulting benefit to lion populations become affordable for conservationists and accessible to community members.

“Dr. Lichtenfeld and her team closely engage local communities to understand and solve the problems that lions cause them,” said Dr. Stuart Pimm, professor of conservation ecology at the Nicholas School of Environment at Duke University and a BCI advisory board member. “The Living Walls save lions cheaply and effectively, providing global lessons for reducing wildlife conflict.”

Living Walls also had an intriguing effect on lion behavior in the rest of the community. Unfortified bomas near those bomas fortified with Living Walls were attacked significantly less, with overall boma depredation rates declining by 90 percent. The study’s authors suggest that this may indicate that attacks of livestock within bomas are a learned behavior and that the Living Walls break that behavior pattern, resulting in an overall reduction in local attacks.

“This paper documents how the Living Walls project virtually eliminates lion predation of cattle, so local communities and the lion population simultaneously benefit,” said National Geographic Fellow Dr. Thomas Lovejoy, professor of environmental science and policy at George Mason University, senior fellow at the UN Foundation and chair of BCI grants committee. “It is a wonderful example of a thoughtful approach combined with simple technology.”

“The success of the African People & Wildlife Fund’s Living Walls program is a beacon of hope for big cats and community conservationists around the world,” said Dr. Luke Dollar, BCI program director. “The Big Cats Initiative is committed to identifying and supporting field-based conservation measures that are effective, economical and results-driven, all of which describe Living Walls.”

The Living Walls program continues to grow across northern Tanzania, reaching new communities through word of mouth from enthusiastic boma owners. More than 400 Living Walls have been installed to date by the African People & Wildlife Fund with support provided by BCI and other generous sponsors, protecting 80,000 head of livestock on a nightly basis, providing peace of mind for some 7,500 people and saving an estimated 80 lions annually from death by spears, guns and poisons.

To increase the number of reinforced bomas, the African People & Wildlife Fund accepts designated funds, and National Geographic’s BCI launched “Build a Boma,” a peer-to-peer awareness and fundraising campaign that features the work of Lichtenfeld and others who are implementing similar projects in Africa.

About the African People & Wildlife Fund:

The African People & Wildlife Fund is a U.S. nonprofit organization dedicated to the conservation of wildlife and important natural habitats in Africa through a community-based approach. APW helps rural communities develop their skills and abilities to protect natural resources in a manner that maximizes their benefits from these landscapes while also preserving ecological integrity. Emphasizing the critical importance of community-led initiatives, the organization provides information, training and service level support to its constituencies to strengthen local institutions and community-driven actions for natural resource management and wildlife conservation. The Tanzania People & Wildlife Fund (TPW) was registered in the United Republic of Tanzania as APW’s first sister organization. TPW operates from the organization’s regional headquarters, the Noloholo Environmental Center on the Maasai Steppe of northern Tanzania, just east of Tarangire National Park.

For more information about APW and TPW, visit our website at http://www.afrpw.org.

About the Big Cats Initiative:

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the 126-year-old National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches more than 600 million people worldwide each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative (BCI) was founded in 2009 with Explorers-in-Residence, filmmakers and conservationists Dereck and Beverly Joubert as a long-term effort to halt the decline of big cats in the wild. BCI supports efforts to save big cats through assessment activities, on-the-ground conservation projects, education and a global public-awareness campaign, “Cause an Uproar,” launched in partnership with Nat Geo WILD. BCI has funded more than 60 field-based conservation projects in 23 countries. For more information, visit CauseAnUproar.org.

Note: Images can be found on the ftp site:

http://press.nationalgeographic.com/downloads/living_walls 

user name:  press    password:  press

Categories: National Geographic

Flyable Saturday

Booker High Wycombe - Sun, 11/30/2014 - 00:50
Some reasonable weather encouraged a flurry of activity at the launchpoint, with the promise of some sunshine, light easterlies and warmer than average temperatures.


Meanwhile, the XC debrief session took place in the clubhouse, attended by many members, with some stretching their legs afterwards to grab a bit of fresh air at the launchpoint. 
A thorough glider and tug cleaning session at the end of the day was preceded by a reminder that canopy misting can be a significant hazard at this time of year!


Categories: Gliding

XC debrief session - Saturday 29 November

Booker High Wycombe - Thu, 11/27/2014 - 11:05

There has been huge enthusiasm this year for xc racing, thanks to the new Handicapped Task method pioneered by Booker. This has generated a momentum that has lead to us bidding for, and getting, a Regional championship for next summer.  In order to learn from this year's activities - what we got right and an honest appraisal of what we got wrong - and apply lessons learned to next year's flying, there will be a debrief session on Saturday 29 November at 10am in the clubhouse.  

Topics to be covered will include:
  • What gets you motivated to fly / what demotivates you from flying
  • General communications
  • Feedback on the task setting
  • Feedback on briefing/debrief
  • Preferred types of task (GP style or held start line: the new distance task, old style tasks, AATs)
  • Facilities improvements we would like

Come along and join the discussion.


 
Categories: Gliding

Give the Gift of Adventure this Holiday with Unique and Personalized Gifts from National Geographic Store

National GeographicNewsFeed - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 16:08

WASHINGTON (Nov. 26, 2014)—If you or your loved one has a thirst for travel and adventure and a love of people, places, culture and history — or if you are simply looking for gifts that are out of the ordinary — the National Geographic Store (natgeostore.com) has a wide variety of unique gifts that are sure to capture the imagination and inspire the spirit of exploration this holiday season.

Featuring an eclectic collection of products that are sourced from artisans across the globe, the store offers textiles, apparel, toys, jewelry, gear and home décor items. All purchases offer direct connections to National Geographic’s network of global artisans and help support vital education, research, exploration and conservation programs throughout the world.

“Each year, buyers from National Geographic travel the globe in search of beautiful, handmade objects that tell a story,” said Kelly Mangis Beam, head of e-commerce and customer experience for National Geographic. “By working directly with our artisans, we provide them with the resources they need to preserve their unique techniques and traditions — and in turn, they are able to share their handiwork with our customers.”

Artisanal Items

The online store’s many artisanal offerings range from traditional silver jewelry pieces from Laos; to the Bolivian Alpaca Sunset Scarf, woven on hand looms in Bolivia; to the Laguiole Horn-handled Knife, handmade in the southern Aubrac region in France.

Personalized and Custom Items

In addition to handcrafted items, the store features personalized items like the Custom Map Puzzle, Personalized Nautical Flag Cufflinks and Nautical Chart Serving Tray; optics and gear such as the National Geographic Night Vision Binoculars and the Deluxe AM/FM Shortwave Field Radio; and children’s toys, including the award-winning Laser Pegs® sets, Kids Interactive Intelliglobe and Programmable Robot Rover.

Retro Items

In keeping with its diverse array of products inspired by more than a century of exploration, the store also features a number of retro-inspired items like the Leather-clad Flashlight and Brass Telescope; and objects of curiosity like the Scrimshaw Whale Box, the Chalet Cuckoo Clock and the German Banjo Weather Station.

For the Traveler

The Outback Oilskin Vest and South African Ranger Hat are perfect for loved ones who want to equip themselves for outdoor adventures. For sea lovers, the jaunty Greek Fisherman Hat and comfy Aran Turtleneck Sweater help them look the part.

Travel enthusiasts can decorate their homes with the Tibetan Chime of Compassion, the Mah-jongg Guest Soaps and a Traditional Irish Aran Throw, or with more traditional holiday items like the Blown-glass Chinese Songbirds, the Moravian Star Ornament or the Holy Land Olive-wood Nativity Set.

One of the store’s most popular categories is jewelry, and this year’s selection includes Carved Chinese Cinnabar Bangles, Personalized Egyptian Pendants and an Agate Druzy Necklace and Earrings from Uruguay.

Ladies can keep warm with a host of finely crafted women’s apparel items, including the Greta Convertible Mittens and Earflap Hat, handmade from pure wool in Kathmandu, Nepal; Wool-lined Suede Travel Shoes; and Hand-Knit Bosnian Slipper Socks.

The Lightweight Leather Travel Tote, Streamlined Leather Travel Bag and Bolivian Tooled-Leather Bag help keep travelers organized for day trips or longer excursions, while the Atomic Field Watch will keep them on time.

For the History Buff

History buffs have a wide selection of media items to choose from, including the “National Geographic War” DVD Collection and books such as “The Aviators” and “The Untold Civil War.” Those interested in their personal ancestry can learn about their genetic heritage through the Geno 2.0 DNA Ancestry Kit, which is exclusive to the National Geographic Store.

Shop online at shopng.org or order via phone at (888) 225-5647. For behind-the-scenes stories about National Geographic’s affiliated artisans and products and the latest deals, follow the catalogue on Twitter @NGStore and visit http://shop.nationalgeographic.com/blog/.

About the National Geographic Society

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches over 600 million people each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com, find us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

NOTE: Gift guides are available at http://bit.ly/natgeogifts. For product samples and images, contact Eric Tunell at etunell@ngs.org or (202) 862-8278.

Categories: National Geographic

New NG Book- WHY’D THEY WEAR THAT? Fashion as the Mirror of History

National GeographicNewsFeed - Wed, 11/19/2014 - 22:45

WASHINGTON (Nov. 19, 2014)—This winter, best-selling author Sarah Albee and National Geographic will take readers on a walk down history’s runway in WHY’D THEY WEAR THAT?: Fashion as the Mirror of History (National Geographic Books; ISBN 978-1-4263-1919-8; on sale Feb. 10, 2015; $19.99; ages 10 and up). From the invention of needles made from woolly mammoth tusks in 10,000 B.C., to the evolution of armor from chain mail to modern-day bulletproof vests, to the controversy surrounding contemporary outsourcing, Albee looks at history through the lens of fashion as a way to engage young readers.

Each chapter focuses on a major period of world history, from the Neolithic era to the present day, and explores the evolution of fashion as a reflection of the politics, class hierarchies, religion and economics of the time. This highly visual collection is full of colorful sidebars that answer questions that are not usually addressed in the classroom: How did people keep their clothes on before zippers or buttons were invented? How did soldiers go to the bathroom when wearing their heavy armor? Pictures, paintings and artifacts further illustrate the concepts discussed in each chapter, while funny anecdotes and a focus on cultures of interest, such as the Vikings, will keep even the most reluctant readers hooked.

Snappy headlines, a stylish layout and a foreword by “Project Runway” fan favorite Tim Gunn make this extensive and entertaining guide perfect for both in-depth study and casual browsing. WHY’D THEY WEAR THAT? is ideal for fashionistas, theater aficionados and history buffs of all ages.

About Sarah Albee

The New York Times best-selling author Sarah Albee has written more than 100 books for kids, ranging from preschool through middle grade. She enjoys writing about topics where history and science connect, including “Bugged: How Insects Changed History” (Walker/Bloomsbury, 2014) and “Poop Happened: A History of the World from the Bottom Up” (Walker/Bloomsbury, 2010). When she isn’t writing books or visiting schools in person or via Skype, Albee enjoys blogging about offbeat history at http://sarahalbeebooks.com and contributing to the Interesting Nonfiction for Kids “Nonfiction Minute” (http://www.nonfictionminute.com).

About Tim Gunn

Tim Gunn is a renowned fashion consultant, television personality, actor and author. He has served as the chair of fashion design at Parsons New School for Design as well as chief creative officer at Liz Claiborne. He is well known as the chief mentor to designers on the hit reality television series “Project Runway” and the headliner of spinoff shows “Tim Gunn’s Guide to Style” and “Under the Gunn.” He is also the author of “A Guide to Quality, Taste and Style” as well as “Tim Gunn’s Fashion Bible: The Fascinating History of Everything in Your Closet.”

About National Geographic Kids

National Geographic Kids inspires young adventurers to explore the world through award-winning magazines, books, apps, games, toys, videos, events and a website, and is the only kids brand with a world-class scientific organization at its core. National Geographic Kids magazine (10 issues per year) and National Geographic Little Kids magazine (six issues per year) are photo-driven publications available on newsstands or by subscription in print and on tablets. The award-winning website kids.nationalgeographic.com excites kids about the planet through games, videos, contests, photos, quizzes and blogs about cultures, animals and destinations. National Geographic Kids Books is the leading nonfiction publisher with 60 titles each year, including The New York Times best-seller “Kids Almanac.” National Geographic Kids safely engages kids to learn through digital play in the virtual animal world of Animal Jam. National Geographic Kids apps bring the best of National Geographic Kids to smartphones and tablets.

Categories: National Geographic

National Geographic, Feeding America and Chef Mario Batali Team Up to Share Stories of Hunger and Hope in Our Country

National GeographicNewsFeed - Wed, 11/19/2014 - 22:18

WASHINGTON (Nov. 19, 2014)—National Geographic and Feeding America today announced that acclaimed chef Mario Batali will serve as a guest editor for National Geographic’s current Your Shot photo assignment, “The Story of Hunger and Hope,” to inspire people to care about the issue of hunger in America. Batali is a member of the Feeding America Entertainment Council and a longtime anti-hunger advocate.

Your Shot (natgeoyourshot.com) is National Geographic’s online community of nearly 500,000 photographers where participants can share images, take part in assignments, lend their voices to compelling stories and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe. Anyone can join the Your Shot community and participate in “The Story of Hunger and Hope” assignment, in which National Geographic and Feeding America are partnering to tell true stories of the people who experience hunger and those who are working to solve the problem. National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths is on assignment for Feeding America while also leading this Your Shot project. Feeding America is the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization, providing food to more than 46 million Americans annually.

“As a chef, the issue of hunger has always been near to my heart. To me, food is so much more than nourishment — it is love; it is hope for a happier life and a better future,” said Batali. “That’s why I’m excited to help inspire people to try to solve hunger in the United States by joining Feeding America — an organization that distributes more than 3.3 billion meals to people in need each year — and National Geographic as a guest editor for the Your Shot assignment “The Story of Hunger and Hope.”

This year, National Geographic magazine has been publishing an eight-month series looking at the future of food and ways of feeding a world population projected to be 9 billion by 2050. Last month, the Society announced a multiyear commitment to exploring issues relating to food security and the creation of sustainable food systems. In tandem with this initiative, “The Story of Hunger and Hope” Your Shot project is designed to capture photographs of what hunger looks like in communities around the country and convey the hope that exists when people work together to solve the problem.

Throughout the assignment, which closes on Sunday, Nov. 30, Batali will help raise awareness by sharing his perspective on submitted photos. The top photographs will be announced and posted on natgeoyourshot.com on Monday, Dec. 8.

About National Geographic

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches over 600 million people each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com.

About Feeding America

Feeding America is the nationwide network of 200 food banks that leads the fight against hunger in the United States. Together, we provide food to more than 46 million people through 60,000 food pantries and meal programs in communities across America. Feeding America also supports programs that improve food security among the people we serve; educates the public about the problem of hunger; and advocates for legislation that protects people from going hungry. Individuals, charities, businesses and government all have a role in ending hunger. Donate. Volunteer. Advocate. Educate. Together we can solve hunger. Visit www.feedingamerica.org, find us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

Categories: National Geographic

National Geographic Magazine, December 2014

National GeographicNewsFeed - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 16:56

Full-size PDF of highlights sheet available here.

 

 

Categories: National Geographic

Booker cadet in British Team

Booker High Wycombe - Sun, 11/16/2014 - 21:46
Former cadet Mike 'Minigat' Gatfield has been selected for the British Team to compete in the 9th FAI Junior World Gliding Championships in Narromine, Australia in 2015. Fantastic news, congratulations Mike!

The only way is up!
Photo: Cotswold Gliding Club
Categories: Gliding

Geography Awareness Week Explores Future of Food

National GeographicNewsFeed - Thu, 11/13/2014 - 17:18

WASHINGTON (Nov. 13, 2014)—Next week, the National Geographic Society will invite the world to celebrate Geography Awareness Week, Nov. 16-22. Established by presidential proclamation in 1987, Geography Awareness Week, also known as GeoWeek, is an annual public awareness program promoted by National Geographic that encourages citizens young and old to appreciate the importance of geography. This year, National Geographic calls on people to celebrate “The Future of Food,” in keeping with the Society’s ongoing food focus.

“GeoWeek annually brings attention to a subject that plays a vital role in every part of our lives,” said Kathleen Schwille, vice president of curriculum, National Geographic Education and Children’s Media. “Knowledge of geography is important for all of us, not just teachers, decision-makers and world leaders. Whether you’re a traveler looking for a hotel near public transportation or a grocery shopper looking to make more sustainable, local food choices, you have to understand the connections that link places and people.”

This year, National Geographic has teamed up with other geography-inclined organizations, including the Association of American Geographers (AAG), the National Council for Geographic Education, Esri, OpenStreetMap, Gamma Theta Upsilon and the American Geographical Society, to celebrate GeoWeek and create activities and events for everyone from armchair geographers to geographic information systems (GIS) professionals.

Online Resources and Activities

The GeoWeek Web page, www.geoweek.org, hosted on National Geographic Education’s award-winning website NatGeoEd.org, offers access to activities, games and other geography-related content. The site provides educators and parents with lists of recommended books, videos, geographer profiles and family-friendly games.

In addition, food-related activities can be found at NatGeoEd.org/food. One example is Planet Food, a new interactive game that explores how food connects us to the rest of the world. The first part of the game allows students to visualize the journey their food takes from its origins. The second part involves critical thinking skills and geographic decision-making in a create-your-own-adventure challenge to make a new chocolate bar. Students can earn badges for making their chocolate in an ethical, environmentally friendly or economically efficient way.

Social Media

GeoWeek is celebrated on Facebook (facebook.com/GeoWeek) and Twitter (@LoveGeography, #GeoWeek), providing a community for geography lovers as well as interesting, relevant content. GeoWeek can also be found in the BuzzFeed community (buzzfeed.com/geographyawarenessweek).

On Monday, Nov. 17, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. EST, National Geographic, along with the AAG, the National Center for Science Education, OpenStreetMap and the Rhode Island and Virginia Geographic Alliances, will lead a Twitter chat to talk about food issues as a gateway to appreciating geography. Interested participants can search #GeoWeek on Twitter to join the conversation.

American college students can take part in the first-ever GeoWeek video contest, with a chance to win four student memberships to the AAG. Students wanting to participate should make a video 30-60 seconds long (no music, please!), upload it to YouTube and share the link on the GeoWeek Facebook page any time from Nov. 16 to 30. The winners will be announced Dec. 3.

Events Around the Country

New in 2014, National Geographic, the U.S. Department of State (MapGive), the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team and OpenStreetMap US are hosting mapping events at colleges, universities and clubs to map food resources around the globe. A full list of these events can be found at osmgeoweek.org. National Geographic will host the flagship OpenStreetMap mapping party on Friday, Nov. 21, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST at National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., with the goal of putting food resources on the map. Admission is free, but interested individuals should RSVP online.

On the local level, grassroots organizers around the country will host events, workshops and contests at local schools and community centers during GeoWeek. The GeoWeek website  offers a toolkit with resources on how to host a local event, such as a community festival or a geography trivia evening.

About the National Geographic Society

With a mission to inspire, illuminate and teach, the National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. The member-supported Society, which believes in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, reaches over 600 million people each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com.

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Categories: National Geographic

Booker's newest member

Booker High Wycombe - Mon, 11/10/2014 - 11:12
Crockett Junior finally made her entrance early on Saturday, weighing in at 9lb 5oz. Nameless as yet, suggestions include Amy and Amelia, just to get her thinking along the right lines.

Congratulations to Sarah and Richard on the safe arrival.

  
Categories: Gliding